The Brisk Convergence

The place where all of my mind's distractions are quickly & energetically unified.
Ask me a question.
Where I reblog
Twitter: @SESweeting Email:TheBriskConvergence @gmail.com

Follow Me on Pinterest

prettycolors:

#bd4244

prettycolors:

#bd4244

Yes. 

See below:

fatalscroll:

Zelda Wynn Valdes was the first black female fashion designer to own her own boutique. Her famous, figure hugging silhouette was worn by stars such as Dorothy Dandridge, Josephine Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Joyce Bryant, Maria Cole, Edna Robinson and later superstars like Gladys Knight and opera diva Jessye Norman. She also designed dresses for legendary figures like Marlene Dietrich and Mae West.

Valdes came up with the costume for the Playboy Bunny which remains the same to this day.

(via foundlovedshared)

Model: Dalila Marin
Playboy Magazine - June 1991 Italy
Photographer: (Unknown, please let me know if you know who the photographer is.)

Model: Dalila Marin

Playboy Magazine - June 1991 Italy

Photographer: (Unknown, please let me know if you know who the photographer is.)

(Source: orangieporangiepuddingpie, via ashlbnn)

Lady Gaga & R. Kelly “Do What You Want” [VIDEO]

Check it: 

rafi-dangelo:

image

Anytime I can dislike Stefani for something other than her wig choices is a great day, because my blood type is Haterade and I thrive on people’s awful decisions.

Making a pro-rape PSA as your music video is one of those awful decisions.

Read More

prettycolors:

#8f707d

prettycolors:

#8f707d

instagram:

Bite-sized Cooking Tutorials with @bartsfishtales

To see more of Bart’s seafood cooking tutorials, follow @bartsfishtales.

Bart van Olphen (@bartsfishtales) is a Dutch chef, fish expert and author who shares 15-second cooking tutorials on Instagram.

His short video recipes, says Bart, are meant to “show people how easy it is to properly prepare a fish,” and to inspire creativity in the kitchen. “You should be able to explain a good dish in one sentence… or in a 15-second video.”

Bart’s videos, however, are as much about education as they are about inspiration. His quest for sustainable seafood has taken him around the world, and many of his videos are filmed on location at sustainable fisheries.

Brilliant.

Yes.

Photos by Charlotte Rutherford for Notion Magazine.

(Had to dig for the credit info. What is with you people and not giving credit?! It’s not like anyone is going to believe that you took the damn photo or something.)

(Source: browngurl, via nadiaaboulhosn)

“I’ve discovered that working under a name other than the one in my passport—while an undeniable hassle in airports, hotels, and banks—is a marvelous way to dodge my inhibitions. It doesn’t say much for human psychology, I suppose, that such a simple-headed trick should work so well, but I’m in no position to be fussy. Writing is hard enough without the sin of pride.”

—   

"Writing is hard enough without the sin of pride." 

John Wray on why he chooses to write under a pseudonym: http://nyr.kr/1oo6ogb (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

Yes.
Lifted from:
bofransson:

Jan De Vliegher (Belgian, b. 1964), Blossoms 10, 2011

Yes.

Lifted from:

bofransson:

Jan De Vliegher (Belgian, b. 1964), Blossoms 10, 2011

behindthegrooves:

On this day in music history: May 22, 1980 - “diana”, the eleventh studio album by Diana Ross is released. Produced by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers, it is recorded at The Power Station, Electric Lady Studios in New York City, and Motown/Hitsville USA Studios in Hollywood, CA from November 1979 - April 1980. Motown superstar Diana Ross will approach Edwards and Rodgers about producing her after her children take her to see Chic at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in the Summer of 1979. Never having worked with a major artist before, the producers will agree to do the project. Sessions will be arduous as the producers will clash with the singer over their working methods, with the situation coming to a head during one vocal session when Edwards tells Ross she’s singing flat. She’ll storm out of the studio, and not come back for several weeks (having gone to the south of France in the interim). After she returns, there will still be issues when she expresses her unhappiness with the way the album is initially mixed. The producers will make some slight alterations and then tell her that if she still isn’t happy, she can remix them herself. With veteran Motown mix engineer Russ Terrana, Ross will remix the entire album, which will create more friction between both sides. So much so, that Edwards and Rodgers will nearly ask to have their names removed from the production credits. Fortunately cooler heads will prevail, and producers credit will remain intact, though they will insist that Ross and Terrana be credited for mixing the album. In spite of all of the behind the scenes drama, the album will be ecstatically received by the public, becoming the Motown superstar’s most successful album ever. Fans and critics will be further taken aback by the album’s striking black and white cover photo taken by legendary fashion photographer Francesco Scavullo (Seventeen, Cosmopolitan), with the inner gatefold photo taken by famed photographer Douglas Kirkland (Look, Life Magazine). Instead of the normally high glamour look Ross is known for, she will be shown with her natural length hair, wet and swept back, wearing a white top and blue jeans (borrowed from model Gia Carangi). The album will spin off the hits “Upside Down” (#1 Pop & R&B), I’m Coming Out” (#5 Pop, #6 R&B), and a third in the UK (“My Old Piano” #5 UK). The album will be reissued in 2003 as a 2 CD Deluxe Edition with the original “Chic Mix” being released for the first time, with a second disc featuring rare and unreleased remixes of several Diana Ross dance floor classics. “diana” will spend eight weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number two on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 5x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.